Why We Program Hero WODs at CrossFit Full Circle

Why We Program Hero WODs at CrossFit Full Circle

By Coach Matt Bahen You’ve probably done a Hero WOD here at CrossFit Full Circle and thought, “Wow! That was tough!” Or maybe you’ve seen a Hero WOD on the website and thought, “Nope! Gonna sleep in that day.” What are Hero WODs? Why are they so frigging hard? What’s the story with them anyway? Well, I’m gonna try to help you understand a little more about them and why we program them here at CrossFit Full Circle. More importantly, I’m gonna try to help you understand the story behind at least a few of them. So what are Hero WODs? Unfortunately the list is way too long, but if you want to see all of them check out this list from CrossFit HQ. Basically, a Hero WOD is a workout that was created by CrossFit to honor somebody who has paid the ultimate sacrifice in the service of others. Most are from the military, and most are men, but not all of them. Some are for firefighters, some are for police officers, and yes some are for women who also have put their lives on the line for us. Each WOD is unique; it usually reflects something from the Hero’s life as far as movements they enjoyed (or hated…) doing, and the “scheme” of each usually holds some significance surrounding the events in which they sacrificed their lives. And that’s why we program them here periodically. We want to remember these heroes and their sacrifice, but more importantly we never want you to forget what they did for us. So why are they so frigging hard? That’s a complicated question to...
Why CrossFit Full Circle?

Why CrossFit Full Circle?

By the Full Circle Family Blair Cooke How long have you been a member? Since it first started in Jason’s garage What programming are you involved in? Strongman Of all the gyms in Richmond, why do you come to CrossFit Full Circle? “The people. I’ve been to other gyms, and it’s not the same kind of community. Despite life getting in the way and being busy, I always come back here.” Valerie McDonnell How long have you been a member? Four years What programming are you involved in? Barbell and CrossFit Of all the gyms in Richmond, why do you come to CrossFit Full Circle? “There are so many different programs offered. I love the variety. I also love the community of people here; I never feel insecure or judged, and everyone is there for each other. The coaching is a huge draw. I’ve been to other gyms, but I’ve come to realize the coaches here have knowledge that makes me feel safe. I haven’t gotten that from other gyms, necessarily.” Scott Byer  How long have you been a member? Four years What programming are you involved in? Strongman Of all the gyms in Richmond, why do you come to CrossFit Full Circle? “I’ve met some awesome people, taken control of my health, and competed in events and accomplish things I never thought I’d be able to do. One of the best decisions I’ve ever made.” Mike Crabtree How long have you been a member? Two years What programming are you involved in? Barbell, Strongman, and CrossFit Of all the gyms in Richmond, why do you come to CrossFit Full Circle? “It’s the family atmosphere. I almost feel as though I’d let somebody down if...
The 2016 CrossFit Open at Full Circle

The 2016 CrossFit Open at Full Circle

By Coach Matt Bahen So, the first Open WOD of 2016 has been done. Who’s still sore? Yep… I am. But there are still FOUR more WODs to go! Aaaaaaaaarrrrrgggghhhhh!!! Don’t fret boys and girls – here are some tips and answers to some frequently asked questions (FAQs for all you techies out there) that we hope will help you thrive during these next four weeks!   Q: The Open? Is that like the CrossFit Games I’ve seen on ESPN? A: Kinda. The Open is the first in a three-step process of crowning the fittest man and woman ON EARTH by CrossFit HQ. Thusly the Open is just that… a competition open to the entire world to compete for that title. So yes, you are competing against Ben Smith and Katrin Davidsdottir, just like the rest of us are. Q: Do you guys (the Coaches) REEEEEALLY not know what the WODs are going to be each week? A: Yep. I mean really, does ANYBODY know what goes on inside the brain of Dave Castro? But seriously, we do not, as some of the coaches are also competitors and thus we don’t deserve a “head start” over any of the rest of the athletes. Q: I’ve only been doing CrossFit for a few months. Should I be doing the Open WODs? A: Yes… under the close supervision of one of our coaches, that is. The WODs (just like any of our WODs) can be scaled to your current level of fitness. Q: But why should I do the Open if I’m not gonna make it to the Games? A: Because who doesn’t like competition? You...
I Can Haz Strongman? – Part 2

I Can Haz Strongman? – Part 2

By Coach Jason Struck This is part 2 of a series that will attempt to explain my background as a coach and its basis for my recommendations to beginners vis-à-vis their preparedness to compete in a Strongman contest. First time here? Read part 1, then head back over. “What if I don’t win?” I sure as shit hope you don’t. Don’t get me wrong, I want what’s best for you. But if you win your very first time competing, that’s a very good sign that you either chose a show that was too easy, or that you waited way too long to start competing. I guess sometimes there are going to be great athletes that transition away from a related sport, like highland games or weightlifting, and they are already stronger and faster than most people out there, and yes, they will do well early. But if you are reading this article, hopefully that doesn’t apply to you. There should be a logical progression in your training and competing. In competing, you should start as early as possible, and you should lose, and you should learn from your loss what your weak points are, and you will know what to work harder on for next time. Then next time, you will do a little better. Repeat this basic process until you are on the world stage. “Is there such thing as starting to compete too soon?” OK, contrary to what I said before, yes, there is probably a time when you are still too new to training and implements to consider competing. When you KNOW you are going to zero...
I Can Haz Strongman? – Part 1

I Can Haz Strongman? – Part 1

By Coach Jason Struck What you are in for: a two-part series that will attempt to explain my background as a coach and its basis for my recommendations to beginners vis-à-vis their preparedness to compete in a Strongman contest. And lots of cat memes. You currently lift. You’ve heard of stuff like clean and jerks, deadlifts, squats, and push presses. You’re aware of other strength sports, like weightlifting, CrossFit, and powerlifting. You know your 1 rep max (1RM) or 5 rep max (5RM), or are at least familiar with the concept, and possess a calculator. You have access to the internet. The first time I ever coached an athlete in a Strongman competition was April of 2012. It was a NAS competition here in town, but really all it was, was me convincing 4 CrossFitters to sign up for the Novice division, mostly for fun. Some of them did well, some of them not so much. When the day was over they were satisfied with their experiences, but to this day, none of them have competed again in Strongman. Eighteen months later, I talked my next victim into trying the sport. In September of 2013, only my second time coaching an athlete through a competition, something different happened. Even though this particular athlete zeroed 2 out of 5 events and finished dead last in every single event, she wanted to do it again. Within a few months, she was signed up for her next show, as were a few of her classmates. Fast forward a year, and it’s the first event hosted by Ladies Lift Here, “The Ice Queen.” This is a...
How to train, compete and hopefully grow like a grown-ass adult

How to train, compete and hopefully grow like a grown-ass adult

by Jason Struck If you regularly take classes from me, you might have noticed I was absent the last two weekends. I competed in my 2nd and 3rd Strongman contests these last two weeks, one in Pittsburgh on May 23rd, and the other in Raleigh May 30th. In North American Strongman terms, they were both Level II shows, which means the weights have to be a certain percentage (or higher) of those utilized at the national championship each year, and there are more spots available to winners to go to Nationals as a result. This tends to attract more and better competitors. By way of comparison, I did a Level I show a few months ago, and there were only 4 men in my division. In Pittsburgh there were 9 and Raleigh 11. In the Level I show, I was awarded 3rd place, but after reviewing the points, I may have actually earned 2nd. In both of the Level II shows, some key events helped me barely stay out of last place.   And that’s what I want to talk about: Losing.   Let’s be real. A lot of you are probably a lot like me: 36 years old, no prior ‘athletic’ experience, at least not as a kid. A full time job, a family, other stuff going on. We know we are never going to the Games, the Olympics or World’s Strongest Man. So why even bother competing? Why not just exercise in the comfort of your own gym?   There’s a ton of reasons that people compete, and choose not to. But I think the biggest deterrent most...